Biology:Trichoglossum hirsutum

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Trichoglossum hirsutum
Gemeine Haarzunge Trichoglossum hirsutum.JPG
Trichoglossum hirsutum
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Fungi
Division:
Subdivision:
Pezizomycotina
Class:
Geoglossomycetes
Order:
Geoglossales
Family:
Genus:
Species:
T. hirsutum
Binomial name
Trichoglossum hirsutum
(Pers.) Boud. 1907

Trichoglossum hirsutum is a species of fungi in the family Geoglossaceae. They are commonly called black earth tongues.

Description

Trichoglossum hirsutum makes a black club shaped fungus 3 – 8 cm high. The spores are produced on the enlarged upper part, which is 5 to 8 mm wide, up to 2 cm high, flattened, spearhead-shaped to ellipsoid and finely velvety. The flesh is thin, tough and brownish. The stem is up to 6 cm long and 2 – 3 mm thick, cylindrical and velvety. Spores 80 - 195 x 5 - 7 micrometers, cylindric-clavate, broadest in the middle and tapering to the blunt ends, with 15 septa. The asci each have 8 spores. The paraphyses are brown, cylindric and coiled at the tips.[1]

Systematics

Trichoglossum hirsutum was first described as Geoglossum hirsutum in 1797 by Persoon. In 1907, Jean Louis Émile Boudier published it as Trichoglossum hirsutum.[2]

The epithet hirsutum refers to the fine hairs that cover the fruit body.

Location

Trichoglossum hirsutum is found in woodlands in North America, Europe, Macaronesia [3] and Africa.[4] It is listed as an endangered species in Lithuania.[5]

Similar species

Trichoglossum walteri is similar but has spores 50 - 115 micrometers, with 7 divisions.[6]

External links

References

See also Wikidata entry Q2010771.