Chemistry:Mathesiusite

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Mathesiusite
Mathesiusite.jpg
Yellow microcrystals of the extremely rare uranium mineral mathesiusite (IMA 2013-046) from one of the only two known localities worldwide: North Mesa Mine group, Temple Mountain, Emery County, Utah, United States of America .
General
CategorySulfate mineral
Formula
(repeating unit)
K5(UO2)4(SO4)4(VO5)·4(H2O)
Strunz classification7.DG.
Crystal systemTetragonal
Crystal classP4/n
Identification
ColorYellowish green
Crystal habitNeedles <0.2 mm in length
CleavagePerfect {010}, good {001}
FractureIrregular/Uneven
TenacityBrittle
Mohs scale hardness2
StreakGreenish white
Specific gravity4.02 (calculated)
Optical propertiesUniaxial (-)
Refractive indexnω = 1.634() nε = 1.597(3)
Birefringenceδ = 0.037
Other characteristicsRadioactive.svg Radioactive
References[1][2]

Mathesiusite is a sulfate mineral containing potassium, vanadium, and uranium and has the chemical formula: K5(UO2)4(SO4)4(VO5)·4(H2O). It is a secondary mineral formed during post-mining processes.

It was discovered in the Jáchymov mining district, Czech Republic and named in 2013 after Johannes Mathesius (1504–1565), who studied minerals from the area (known then as Joachimsthal, Bohemia).[3]

References

  1. Mathesiusite on Mindat.org
  2. Mathesiusite on Mineralien Atlas
  3. Plášil, J.; Veselovský, F.; Hloušek, J.; Škoda, R.; Novák, M.; Sejkora, J.; Čejka, J.; Škácha, P. et al. (April 1, 2014). "Mathesiusite, K5(UO2)4(SO4)4(VO5)(H2O)4, a new uranyl vanadate-sulfate from Jáchymov, Czech Republic". American Mineralogist 99 (4): 625-632. doi:10.2138/am.2014.4681. http://ammin.geoscienceworld.org/content/99/4/625. Retrieved 13 June 2017.