Philosophy:Noogenesis

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Noogenesis is the emergence and evolution of intelligence.

Term origin

Noo-, nous (UK: /ˈns/, US: /ˈns/), from the ancient Greek νόος, is a term that currently encompasses the meanings "mind, intelligence, intellect, reason; wisdom; insight, intuition, and thought."[1]

In 1871, the medical doctor Hugh Doherty used the term "noogenesis" in his book Organic Philosophy, using it to refer to "the growth of mind in the human race".[2]

Anthropologist and philosopher Pierre Teilhard de Chardin mentioned "noogenesis" in his book The Phenomenon of Man, published in 1955. In Teilhard's stages of evolution, noogenesis, the emergence of mind, follows geogenesis (beginning of Earth), biogenesis (beginning of life) and anthropogenesis (beginning of humanity), and is followed by Christogenesis, the genesis of the "total Christ", or the pleroma.

"With and within the crisis of reflection, the next term in the series manifests itself. Psychogenesis has led to man. Now it effaces itself, relieved or absorbed by another and a higher function—the engendering and subsequent development of the mind, in one word noogenesis. When for the first time in a living creature instinct perceived itself in its own mirror, the whole world took a pace forward."[3] "There is only one way in which our minds can integrate into a coherent picture of noogenesis these two essential properties of the autonomous centre of all centres, and that is to resume and complement our Principle of Emergence."[4] "The idea is that of noogenesis ascending irreversibly towards Omega through the strictly limited cycle of a geogenesis."[5] "To make room for thought in the world, I have needed to ' interiorise ' matter : to imagine an energetics of the mind; to conceive a noogenesis rising upstream against the flow of entropy; to provide evolution with a direction, a line of advance and critical points..."[6]

The lack of any kind of definition of the term has led to a variety of interpretations of the text.[7]

See also

References

  1. The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles (3 ed.), Oxford University Press, 1973, p. 1417 
  2. Doherty, Hugh (1871) (in en). Organic Philosophy; Or, Man's True Place in Nature ...: Outlines of biology. Body, soul, mind, spirit. Trübner & Company. https://books.google.com/books?id=AlccAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA467. 
  3. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man. Harper Torchbooks, The Cloister Library, Harper & Row, Publishers, 1961, p. 181.
  4. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man. Harper Torchbooks, The Cloister Library, Harper & Row, Publishers, 1961, p. 270.
  5. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man. Harper Torchbooks, The Cloister Library, Harper & Row, Publishers, 1961, p. 273.
  6. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man. Harper Torchbooks, The Cloister Library, Harper & Row, Publishers, 1961, p. 290.
  7. Steinhart E. Teilhard de Chardin and Transhumanism // Journal of Evolution and Technology — Vol. 20 Issue 1 -December 2008 — pgs 1-22 ISSN 1541-0099 [1]