Astronomy:2156 Kate

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Short description: Highly elongated background asteroid
2156 Kate
002156-asteroid shape model (2156) Kate.png
Shape model of Kate from its lightcurve
Discovery [1]
Discovered byS. Belyavsky
Discovery siteSimeiz Obs.
Discovery date23 September 1917
Designations
(2156) Kate
Named afterKate Kristensen
(wife of naming astronomer)[2]
A917 SH · 1937 PK
1954 UT2 · 1956 GP
1957 QK · 1969 BE
1970 LK · 1974 RL1
1976 GK1 · 1979 BC
Minor planet categorymain-belt · (inner)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc99.61 yr (36,384 days)
|{{{apsis}}}|helion}}2.6942 AU
|{{{apsis}}}|helion}}1.7900 AU
2.2421 AU
Eccentricity0.2016
Orbital period3.36 yr (1,226 days)
Mean anomaly264.22°
Mean motion0° 17m 36.96s / day
Inclination5.3475°
Longitude of ascending node17.175°
4.7281°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter8.131±0.144 km[3][4]
8.61 km (calculated)[5]
Rotation period5.62 h[6]
5.62215±0.00005 h[7]
5.6228±0.0003 h[lower-alpha 1]
5.623±0.005 h[8]
Geometric albedo0.189±0.028[4]
0.20 (assumed)[5]
0.2242±0.0353[3]
Tholen = S[1] · A[9]
B–V = 0.916[1]
U–B = 0.525[1]
Absolute magnitude (H)12.69[1][5][3] · 13.23±1.05[9]


2156 Kate (prov. designation: A917 SH) is a highly elongated background asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt. The asteroid was discovered on 23 September 1917, by Soviet–Russian astronomer Sergey Belyavsky at the Simeiz Observatory on the Crimean peninsula.[10] It was named for Kate Kristensen, wife of astronomer L. K. Kristensen.[2] The bright S-type/A-type asteroid has a rotation period of 5.6 hours and measures approximately 8 kilometers (5.0 miles) in diameter.

Orbit and classification

Kate orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.8–2.7 AU once every 3 years and 4 months (1,226 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.20 and an inclination of 5° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] As no precoveries were taken, and no prior identifications were made, the asteroid's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at Simeiz in 1917.[10]

Naming

This minor planet was named after Kate Kristensen, wife of astronomer L. K. Kristensen, who was involved in the body's orbit computation.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 1 April 1980 (M.P.C. 5284).[11]

Physical characteristics

In the Tholen classification, Kate is a common S-type asteroid.[1] It has also been characterized as a rare A-type asteroid by Pan-STARRS' large photometric survey.[9]

Rotation period

Lightcurve-based 3D-model of Kate

A large number of rotational lightcurves were obtained from photometric observations. They gave a well-defined rotation period of 5.620 to 5.623 hours with a brightness variation between 0.5 and 0.9 magnitude ({{{1}}}).[6][7][8][lower-alpha 1]

Diameter and albedo

According to the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's space-based Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Kate measures 8.131 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.189 and 0.2242, respectively,[3][4] while the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony asteroids of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 8.61 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 12.69.[5]

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Dunckel (2011) web: rotation period 5.6228±0.0003 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.84 mag. (U=3). Summary figures for (2156) Kate at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL)

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2156 Kate (A917 SH)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2002156. Retrieved 11 June 2017. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(2156) Kate". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 175. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_2157. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D. et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal 741 (2): 25. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Bibcode2011ApJ...741...90M. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?bibcode=2011ApJ...741...90M. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J. et al. (November 2011). "Main Belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE. I. Preliminary Albedos and Diameters". The Astrophysical Journal 741 (2): 20. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/68. Bibcode2011ApJ...741...68M. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?bibcode=2011ApJ...741...68M. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 "LCDB Data for (2156) Kate". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). http://www.minorplanet.info/PHP/generateOneAsteroidInfo.php?AstInfo=2156%7CKate. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 Binzel, R. P.; Mulholland, J. D. (December 1983). "A photoelectric lightcurve survey of small main belt asteroids". Icarus 56 (3): 519–533. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(83)90170-7. ISSN 0019-1035. Bibcode1983Icar...56..519B. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?bibcode=1983Icar...56..519B. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 Hanus, J.; Durech, J.; Broz, M.; Warner, B. D.; Pilcher, F.; Stephens, R. et al. (June 2011). "A study of asteroid pole-latitude distribution based on an extended set of shape models derived by the lightcurve inversion method". Astronomy and Astrophysics 530: 16. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116738. Bibcode2011A&A...530A.134H. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?bibcode=2011A&A...530A.134H. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  8. 8.0 8.1 Kryszczynska, A.; Colas, F.; Polinska, M.; Hirsch, R.; Ivanova, V.; Apostolovska, G. et al. (October 2012). "Do Slivan states exist in the Flora family?. I. Photometric survey of the Flora region". Astronomy and Astrophysics 546: 51. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219199. Bibcode2012A&A...546A..72K. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?bibcode=2012A&A...546A..72K. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus 261: 34–47. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Bibcode2015Icar..261...34V. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?bibcode=2015Icar..261...34V. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  10. 10.0 10.1 "2156 Kate (A917 SH)". Minor Planet Center. https://www.minorplanetcenter.net/db_search/show_object?object_id=2156. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  11. "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. https://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/ECS/MPCArchive/MPCArchive_TBL.html. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 

External links