Ultra-low-voltage processor

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Ultra-low-voltage processors are a class of microprocessor that are deliberately underclocked to consume less power (typically 17 W or below), at the expense of performance.

These processors are commonly used in subnotebooks, netbooks, ultraportables and embedded devices; where low power dissipation and long battery life are required.

"Ultra low-voltage" is in comparison to desktop processors which are often in the 50-150 watt range. There are numerous widely used embedded processors—which are not Intel x86 compatible—that use significantly less power, even less than 1W.

Notable examples

  • Intel Atom - Up to 2.0 GHz at 2.4 W (Z550)
  • Intel Pentium M - Up to 1.3 GHz at 5 W (ULV 773)
  • Intel Core 2 Solo - Up to 1.4 GHz at 5.5 W (SU3500)
  • Intel Core Solo - Up to 1.3 GHz at 5.5 W (U1500)
  • Intel Celeron M - Up to 1.2 GHz at 5.5 W (ULV 722)
  • VIA Eden - Up to 1.5 GHz at 7.5 W
  • VIA C7 - Up to 1.6 GHz at 8 W (C7-M ULV)
  • VIA Nano - Up to 1.3 GHz at 8 W (U2250)
  • AMD Athlon Neo - Up to 1 GHz at 8 W (Sempron 200U)
  • AMD Geode - Up to 1 GHz at 9 W (NX 1500)
  • Intel Core 2 Duo - Up to 1.3 GHz at 10 W (U7700)
  • Intel Core i3/i5/i7 - Up to 1.5 GHz at 13 W (Core i7 3689Y)
  • AMD A Series - Up to 3.2 GHz at 15 W (A10-7300P)

See also





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