Chemistry:Triazene

From HandWiki
Short description: Unsaturated inorganic compound of formula N₃H₃
Triazene
Structural formula of triazene
Space-filling model of the triazene molecule
Names
IUPAC name
Triazene
Systematic IUPAC name
Triaz-1-ene[1]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
49028
UNII
Properties
H3N3
Molar mass 45.045 g·mol−1
Hazards
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
Flammability code 4: Will rapidly or completely vaporize at normal atmospheric pressure and temperature, or is readily dispersed in air and will burn readily. Flash point below 23 °C (73 °F). E.g. propaneHealth code 3: Short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury. E.g. chlorine gasReactivity code 4: Readily capable of detonation or explosive decomposition at normal temperatures and pressures. E.g. nitroglycerinSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
4
3
4
Related compounds
Other anions
Triphosphane
Related Binary azanes
ammonia
diazane
triazane
Related compounds
Diazene
Tetrazene
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references
Tracking categories (test):

Triazene is an unsaturated inorganic compound having the chemical formula N3H3. It has one double bond and is the second-simplest member of the azene class of hydronitrogen compounds, after diimide. Triazenes are a class of organic compounds containing the functional group -N(H)-N=N-. Triazene, possibly along with its isomer triimide (HNNHNH), has been synthesized in electron-irradiated ices of ammonia and ammonia/dinitrogen and detected in the gas phase after sublimation.[2]

References

  1. "triazene (CHEBI:35468)". Chemical Entities of Biological Interest. EMBL-EBI. http://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi/searchFreeText.do?searchString=15056-34-5. 
  2. Forstel, Tsegaw, Maksyutenko, Mebel, Sander, & Kaiser. "On the formation of N3H3 isomers in irradiated ammonia bearing ices: Triazene (H2NNNH) or Triimide (HNHNNH)", ChemPhysChem, 2016, 17, 2726.

External links