Chemistry:Indium trihydride

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Indium trihydride
Indigane-3D-balls.png
Names
Systematic IUPAC name
Indigane[1] (substitutive)
Trihydridoindium[1] (additive)
Other names
Indium(III) hydride
Indium trihydride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
163932
Properties
InH3
Molar mass 117.842 g mol−1
Structure
Trigonal planar
Dihedral
Related compounds
Related metallanes
Aluminium hydride

Borane
Hydrogen iodide
Hydrogen telluride
Rubidium hydride
Stannane
Stibine

Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Indium trihydride is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula (InH3). It has been observed in matrix isolation and laser ablation experiments.[2][3] Gas phase stability has been predicted.[4] The infrared spectrum was obtained in the gas phase by laser ablation of indium in presence of hydrogen gas [5] InH3 is of no practical importance.

Chemical properties

Solid InH3 is a three-dimensional network polymeric structure, where In atoms are connected by In-H-In bridging bonds, is suggested to account for the growth of broad infrared bands when samples of InH3 and InD3 produced on a solid hydrogen matrix are warmed.[5] Such a structure is known for solid AlH3.[6] When heated above −90 °C, indium trihydride decomposes to produce indium–hydrogen alloy and elemental hydrogen. As of 2013, the only known method of synthesising indium trihydride is the autopolymerisation of indane below −90 °C.

Other indium hydrides

thumb|left|188px|Structure of the adduct of InH3 and [[tricyclohexylphosphine.[7]]] Several compounds with In-H bonds have been reported.[7] Examples of complexes with two hydride ligands replaced by other ligands are K3[K(Me2SiO)7][HIn(Me3CCH2)3]4[8] and HIn(2-Me2NCH2-C6H4)2.

Although InH3 is labile, adducts are known with the stoichiometry InH3Ln (n = 1 or 2).[9] 1:1 amine adducts are made by the reaction of LiInH4 with a trialkylammonium salt. The trimethylamine complex is only stable below −30 °C or in dilute solution. The 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with tricyclohexylphosphine (PCy3) have been characterised crystallographically. The average In-H bond length is 168 pm.[7] Indium hydride is also known to form adducts with NHCs.[10]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Indigane (CHEBI:30429)". Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI). UK: European Bioinformatics Institute. http://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi/searchId.do?chebiId=CHEBI:30429. 
  2. Pullumbi, P.; Bouteiller, Y.; Manceron, L.; Mijoule, C. (July 1994). "Aluminium, gallium and indium trihydrides. An IR matrix isolation and ab initio study". Chemical Physics 185 (1): 25–37. doi:10.1016/0301-0104(94)00111-1. Bibcode1994CP....185...25P. 
  3. Aldridge, S.; Downs, A. J. (2001). "Hydrides of the Main-Group Metals: New Variations on an Old Theme". Chemical Reviews 101 (11): 3305–65. doi:10.1021/cr960151d. PMID 11840988. 
  4. Hunt, P.; Schwerdtfeger, P. (1996). "Are the Compounds InH3 and TlH3 Stable Gas Phase or Solid State Species?". Inorganic Chemistry 35 (7): 2085–2088. doi:10.1021/ic950411u. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 Andrews, L.; Wang, X. (2004). "Infrared Spectra of Indium Hydrides in Solid Hydrogen and of Solid Indane". Angewandte Chemie International Edition 43 (13): 1706–1709. doi:10.1002/anie.200353216. PMID 15038043. 
  6. Turley, J. W.; Rinn, H. W. (1969). "The Crystal Structure of Aluminum Hydride". Inorganic Chemistry 8 (1): 18–22. doi:10.1021/ic50071a005. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Jones, C. (2001). "The stabilisation and reactivity of indium trihydride complexes". Chemical Communications (22): 2293–2298. doi:10.1039/b107285b. ISSN 1359-7345. PMID 12240044. 
  8. Rowen Churchill, M.; Lake, C. H.; Chao, S.-H. L.; Beachley, O. T. (1993). "Silicone grease as a precursor to a pseudo crown ether ligand: crystal structure of [K+]3[K(Me2SiO)7+][InH(CH2CMe3)3]4". Journal of the Chemical Society, Chemical Communications 1993 (20): 1577–1578. doi:10.1039/C39930001577. 
  9. Wang, X.; Andrews, L. (20 May 2004). "Infrared Spectra of Indium Hydrides in Solid Hydrogen and Neon". The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 108 (20): 4440–4448. doi:10.1021/jp037942l. Bibcode2004JPCA..108.4440W. 
  10. Abernethy, C. D.; Cole, M. L.; Jones, C. (2000). "Preparation, Characterization, and Reactivity of the Stable Indium Trihydride Complex [InH3{IMes}]". Organometallics 19 (23): 4852–4857. doi:10.1021/om0004951.